3 Ways Your Company Is Contributing To The IT Skills Gap

People have plenty to say about the North East’s skills gap, but do little to help the situation themselves.

If you’re in the business of hiring IT professionals and haven’t noticed or come a cropper to the skills shortage, where have you been?

 

Trying to find an exact fit

If you were to say: “I want a three michelin star Italian restaurant that serves excellent tagliatelle and also has an area for alfresco dining.” You’re going to have far fewer options than if you were to say: “I want an upscale restaurant with great food.”

This metaphor also applies to looking for IT talent. Broaden your search and you’ll likely find that diamond in the rough. Time and time again hiring companies, looking for IT staff, fail to see the costs of waiting, and won’t consider excellent candidates who they could mold to fit the position. The end result is an IT department with a narrowing skillset and an IT skills gap propelled by businesses who call for haste over quality.

Failing to Focus on Education and Training

Most employers are seeking to get the skills they need through hiring. Yet significant aspects of those skillsets need to come from work experience. Evidently the need is there, as opportunities for training and apprenticeships increase.

The Labour Force Survey, produced by the Office for National Statistics (ONS), recently indicated that only 15% of employees had received any form of training in the previous three months.

Employers are expecting today’s IT professional to take up the slack. Nowadays, companies are expecting employees to join the workforce with those skills already in place without having any infrastructure in place to train for the skills they need, but that’s just not happening.

While independent programming boot camps and e-learning providers are helping candidates help themselves gain valuable tech skills employers should consider i=L3Q0091-ptnvesting in internal education programs and courses to foster talent and grow it from within.

Not Paying Enough to Compete

Businesses need to be mindful that in order to obtain and retain talent with the in-demand skills, they’re going to have to pay the market rate which, partly due to the skills gap, has increased. In tech heavy cities both in the UK and worldwide software engineers and developers are demanding top dollar – and that’s what they’re getting as canny companies that have their finger on the pulse of the market recognise the need to pay a premium for these skills.

 Why not invest in training and education for the talent you already have instead? This is where Wolf Group can help!

Our innovative IT training Academy has been constructed by IT professionals, actively working in the market the programme is designed to serve. The resulting clear vision is totally adaptive to the rapidly changing needs of the region’s IT business community.

The bespoke peer to peer learning model only draws support from relevant qualifications and relies more heavily on the benefits of candidates enjoying a far more immersive real world experience.

Businesses and organisations that follow a route such as this are, in turn, helping to remedy the skills gap problem first-hand by investing in their workforce to bring about much needed, upskilled IT labour.


For more information on how your business could benefit from the Wolf Academy’s business services, visit our Academy pages.

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